18th August 2012 - 1:16 pm
"I think what our board was saying was, ‘Why wouldn’t we want to provide an affordable tuition rate for these students?’… So that they can get a college degree and become meaningful contributors to the economy of Colorado."

Stephen Jordan, President of Metropolitan State University of Denver, on the school’s decision to offer discounted tuition to undocumented immigrants living in Colorado.

To quote Jose Antonio Vargas, “America is not a zero-sum game. Never was, never will be. We all benefit when everyone is educated.” 

13th July 2012 - 10:12 am
shortformblog:

One year ago, journalist Jose Antonio Vargas revealed to the world that he was an undocumented immigrant — building his entire career, which included time at The Washington Post and The Huffington Post, on a lie. Vargas looks back at the past year in an interview with BuzzFeed, where he considers the weirdness of becoming an activist, his friends lost (many in the news industry), and his friends gained (Mark Zuckerberg, Aaron Sorkin). Great piece.

“…and here’s my question to journalists everywhere—in a country that’s going to get gayer, browner, more Asian, more women in power, how are we going to accurately reflect the different realities that are out there?”

shortformblog:

One year ago, journalist Jose Antonio Vargas revealed to the world that he was an undocumented immigrant — building his entire career, which included time at The Washington Post and The Huffington Post, on a lie. Vargas looks back at the past year in an interview with BuzzFeed, where he considers the weirdness of becoming an activist, his friends lost (many in the news industry), and his friends gained (Mark Zuckerberg, Aaron Sorkin). Great piece.

…and here’s my question to journalists everywhere—in a country that’s going to get gayer, browner, more Asian, more women in power, how are we going to accurately reflect the different realities that are out there?”

20th June 2012 - 3:42 pm

Obama's immigration act is a game-changer

In two month’s time, when the first group of DREAMers comes forward to affirmatively apply for protection from deportation, it will be similar in many ways to how some people felt when same-sex couples were granted marriage licenses or African-Americans were allowed to register to vote in the South.

As in those occurrences, DREAMers coming forward will mark a new chapter, but not the last chapter, in a long struggle for inclusion in society. What these young undocumented workers are being offered is temporary and incomplete, but tremendously important to them. And while it does not represent protection for their parents or neighbors, who might also be assets to their communities, it serves as a dramatic symbol to the rest of the nation that times are changing.

15th June 2012 - 10:14 am

Obama To Stop Deporting DREAM-Eligible Youth, Protecting 1 Million Undocumented Students

President Obama will announce a new immigration policy this morning that will allow some undocumented students to avoid deportation and receive work authorization.

Under the “deferred action” policy, a Department of Homeland Security directive, students in the U.S. who are already in deportation proceedings or those who qualify for the DREAM Act and have yet to come forward to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials, will not be deported and will be allowed to work in the United States.

An estimated 1 million young people could benefit from the deferral. To be eligible, applicants have to be between 15 and 30 years old, live in the U.S. for five years, and maintain continuous U.S. residency. People who have one felony, one serious misdemeanor, or three minor misdemeanors will be ineligible to apply. “Deferred action” will last for two years and can be renewed.

Obama is expected to speak about this new policy later today

Although deferred action doesn’t provide a path for citizenship like the DREAM Act would, this is an amazing step forward for DREAMers. The DREAM Act doesn’t stand a chance in the current Congress and this is one easy way the administration can help out younger undocumented immigrants. Here’s hoping that after November, Congress will be a friendlier place for immigration reform.

14th June 2012 - 2:46 pm

Why Undocumented Workers Are Good For The Economy

Political motivation aside, Arizona’s law was viewed as an attempt to deport the state to economic prosperity. But SB 1070 only worsened Arizona’s fiscal woes, according to several studies. In the few months after its passage, Arizona’s economy lost $141 million, including $45 million in hotel and lodging cancellations and $96 million in lost commercial revenue, according to a joint study by the Center for American Progress and the Immigration Policy Center. A drop in tourism also resulted in an estimated 2,761 jobs lost, resulting in $253 million lost in economic output. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit blocked most of SB 1070’s provisions. But if ever fully implemented, the study adds, the law would eliminate an estimated 580,000 jobs for immigrant and native-born Arizonians, shrinking the state’s economy by $48.8 billion. These figures don’t include the $1.9 million Arizona has spent to defend the state from lawsuits, which have forced Gov. Jan Brewer to establish a legal defense fund for contributions.

Despite the fiscal fallout, Alabama followed Arizona’s footsteps and approved its own immigration law in September. That measure, which analysts say is more draconian than Arizona’s, could result in a $10.8 billion loss to the state’s GDP, mostly due to reduced demand for goods and services provided by Alabama businesses, according to a widely cited study by economists at the Center for Business & Economic Research at the University of Alabama. Professor Samuel Addy, who led the study, estimates that the loss of 40,000 to 80,000 undocumented immigrants would result in 70,000 to 140,000 lost jobs in Alabama, which amount to $1.2 to $5.8 billion in lost earnings. An additional $57 to $264 million would be lost in state income and sales tax collections.

These dire forecasts contrast starkly with the rosy economic projections of hypothetical immigration reform. The libertarian CATO Institute argues in a recent report that comprehensive immigration reform, which would pave the way to citizenship for the roughly 12 million undocumented immigrants, would yield at least $1.5 trillion in added GDP over 10 years as a result of increased consumption, job creation and additional tax revenue. In this scenario, California would see a $5.3 billion increase and Arizona would generate a $1.6 billion increase, the study adds.

11th June 2012 - 5:36 pm
washingtonpoststyle:

On Friday she graduated with honors from a high school outside of Richmond. By June 20 she must be back in Guatemala, which she left at age 4, or face deportation. Meet Heydi Mejia.
Photo by Katherine Frey (The Washington Post)

A great article but I really wish The Washington Post would drop the i -word. No human being is illegal. 

washingtonpoststyle:

On Friday she graduated with honors from a high school outside of Richmond. By June 20 she must be back in Guatemala, which she left at age 4, or face deportation. Meet Heydi Mejia.

Photo by Katherine Frey (The Washington Post)

A great article but I really wish The Washington Post would drop the i -word. No human being is illegal.